Spotlight on T-Dubb (@T_Dubb_O)

St. Louis, MO Since the age of six, T-Dubb-O has been a man with a message. A son born to a musical family, he had progressed to writing, producing, and recording by the mere age of eleven. In 2010, T-Dubb entered the Streets Status Battle League arena and was quickly recognized as one of the best rappers coming out of Missouri, and continued to make a name for himself on the international stage. His music has met wild success, garnering support from outlets both in America and abroad, from Rolling Stone, to BET, to MSNBC.

Dubb is far more than just a rapper, and has used his success in the music game to chronicle and fight for the end of racial disparity and to stand in the fight against injustice. As a black man in the wake of Ferguson, Dubb was on the frontlines of heated protests, battling the wounds of systematic racism endured by people of color at the hands of the government and law enforcement. His activist work with grass roots organization Hands Up United landed him in a personal meeting with President Barack Obama, to discuss issues of race and injustice with the esteemed leader. From the streets to the Oval Office, Dubb’s plight has not been an easy one. As he put it, “I shook Obama’s hand with the same hand I sold crack with.”

His latest project, an album released in January of 2016, is a testimony to his fight for justice across the globe. Its title, The Drop, pays homage to his group’s work in Mexico, where he continues to fight the battle of police corruption and brutality. After a group of revolutionists were kidnapped and murdered at the hands of the Mexican Police, a young Mexican woman explained to Dubb that this was the last straw, using the proverb, “The drop that spilled the cup.”

Dubb’s music is full of power and street influence, and a worldly perspective that is severely lacking in other modern rap. In 2016, when so much needs to be said, T-Dubb dares to speak.

www.T-Dubb-O.com

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